You Probably Have An Unfair Bias Against Indie/Self-Published Authors (For No Actual Reason)

Blog Articles

“Indie authors… there’s a reason none of them have been traditionally published. Most of them need to…leave the writing to the writers who are actually good at it.” — Actual quote from a book group I’m in.

When it comes to writing, criticism is easy to come by but difficult to receive. And given that writers are a notoriously delicate, brooding bunch, it’s not hard to understand why sorting through the criticism chaff to get to the good advice wheat is one of the hardest things to do as an author.

You’ve created this book baby. You birthed it from your own head, fed it all of your fears and hopes and dreams, watched it grow, helped it overcome obstacles and form into a coherent being… and then handed it over to a group of people with eager red pens and asked them to tell you all of the ugly, bad things that are wrong with it.

It’s one of the hardest things you’ll ever do. It never gets easier, no matter how many times you go through it.

And if that weren’t enough, you have to keep going through this process, day in, day out, for the rest of your life, facing criticism, backlash, and yes, bad reviews. And some of these reviews might be nothing more than a misunderstanding or someone who is the polar opposite of your target audience buying the book and making your day suck, but some might have valid points. And those are the ones that will really keep you up at night, wondering if you’re a crap writer after all.

In the writing world, some people are so incredibly eager to cut down someone else’s book, it’s astonishing. And many of these unhelpful remarks get unfairly pointed toward indie and self-published authors by people who have never written a book themselves (or take their job as an indie book reviewer a touch too seriously). It’s completely, totally, unabashedly unfair.

And it’s also an accusation that’s fully baseless.

Just because a book has been published by an indie or self-published author does not automatically make it crap.

It doesn’t mean that the book couldn’t stand the test of going through a traditional publisher. It doesn’t mean that it’s not any good and shouldn’t ever be read. And it’s not even just readers that have this unfair bias against indie/self-publishers. It’s also other writers who look down their noses at self-publishers with scorn because they haven’t “passed the trials” that other writers had to.

“But,” you might say, “there are some really, truly, 100 percent awful self-published books that the writer had no business sharing with the world.”

To be perfectly honest, I agree with you. Some of the self-published books I’ve seen and edited are so bad they could curdle milk. But does that bring down the self-publishing market for everyone? No. Does it flood the market? Sure. Does it make it more difficult for your book to be seen? Not if you’re marketing, no.

That’s like saying because some indie movies sucked, that all indie films are awful and lesser than their blockbuster compatriots and not worth watching. But this isn’t true. Amazing indie films get released all the time while the not-so-great ones continue to pour in around them. That’s just the creative process. And once upon a time, your favorite director or author might have been down among those “lesser” indie creations, trying to learn how to get better.

It’s the same thing in the book market. The only reason that you might struggle to make room with indie or self-published authors is if you’re publishing through Amazon’s Kindle Direct, which encourages everyone to make their books as cheap as possible… But that’s another discussion entirely.

The truth is that traditional publishing doesn’t rest entirely on the merits of your work. Maybe you really struggled to get the words out in your query letter and the reader trashed it immediately. The agent or reader might just have a migraine and not really focus on your work that day. They could read literally the first line and hate the way you’ve introduced your character without reading further than thirty words into your entire 80,000-word manuscript.

This is 100 percent a real issue. I have talked to agents and publishers I’ve met at conventions about this. Yes, it really happens. There is literally nothing more inspirational than remembering that Harry Potter was rejected by publishers twelve times before a kid ended up reading it and loving it. But these stories of inspiration are few and far between, and it’s usually rejection for the majority of writers trying to get their work seen for a myriad of reasons — only a small portion of which might be their actual work.

In the real publishing world, it isn’t just that you’re competing with other writers and vying for that golden pedestal position. It’s a battle against timing, opportunity, and sheer dumb luck. Sometimes you’ve got a great book but you can’t get it in front of a traditional publisher. Maybe they aren’t accepting unsolicited manuscripts. Maybe they’re not accepting new work, period. Maybe they’re full up on the genre your book is written in and don’t have plans to publish more for about a year.

An indie author’s writing and effort aren’t the only things affecting their rejection from traditional publishers. And when you want to publish your book and your traditional options are limited, it’s great to know that there are hundreds of indie publishers with great authors and support staff that can fit your needs and get that wonderful story out to the world at large.

For others, self-publishing is the best way. Sure, it costs more money up front, but it gives you complete control over your book’s content and production, marketing, and even art choices. Plus, there’s no one to split royalties with!

So next time you hear someone suggest that indie and self-published authors are all failed writers who couldn’t cut it, remind them that they didn’t stop watching movies even though they’d seen a few bad ones. We all saw The Phantom Menace, and yet somehow Star Wars is still hugely popular.

Don’t judge non-traditional writers on the failures of others in their same field. Give them a chance. Who knows? You might just find a new favorite author you never knew existed before.

Twisted Wonderland Pre-Order

Blog Articles

I’m so excited to announce the soon-to-be sale of Twisted Wonderland, a collection of dark retellings of Alice in Wonderland from the view point of your favorite characters for only $2.99!

My story Curiouser and Curiouser is featured along with six other talented authors’ tales, and you can pre-order your own copy here before it comes out on August 31!

36959187_490226658094700_1257741959582187520_o

For an even better bonus, if you do pre-order a copy, you can also enter to win a $10 Amazon gift card and a free copy of the paperback! Just click this link to post your proof of purchase on Facebook.

See you in Wonderland!

 

18 Books That Will Give You an Accidental All-Nighter

Blog Articles

Books Rock My World

Every bookworm knows the feeling. “I’m just going to relax a little and read my book before bed” turns into “Why is it light outside? What time is it? WHAT HAPPENS NEXT?”

There are a few qualities that combine into a magical mix that keeps us stuck to the page. Great characters, embroiled deeply in plenty of complications and stuck behind insurmountable obstacles. Wonderful prose, although if the premise is good enough just “good” writing is plenty good enough to keep us hooked.

Here is an assortment of books from many genres that combine all of these qualities into something that readers just couldn’t put down. Anyone of them might give you an accidental all-night reading session. You have been warned.

*Book descriptions come from Goodreads*

1. The Illuminae Series by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

IMG_20180607_174343_922 (1).jpg

This series is completely unique! The format is brilliant (yes, the story is told…

View original post 1,999 more words

Are You an Introverted or Extroverted Reader?

Blog Articles

Books Rock My World

Do only introverts love reading? Spending hours, alone, with a book, does seem to be the perfect activity for someone who is satisfied spending a day with me, myself, and I. The cliché is that all bookworms are introverts, and, like all stereotypes, it’s not really true.

Sure, lots of dedicated readers are introverts. But the main fact the stereotype forgets is that all readers are human, and humans come in infinite variety. There are plenty of extroverts who love the written word, and lots of ambiverts either hanging out with them or chilling on their own.

Do you have the traits of an extrovert bookworm? An introvert? Or a combination, depending on the day and the book? Read on to decide which traits are yours.

Introverts:

  • Feel recharged after a long period spent with a good book.
  • Feel the sense of being a part of the collective human experience…

View original post 337 more words

Short Stories for Sale!

Blog Articles

If you’re like me, you like to sit down and read as frequently as possible. But sometimes there just isn’t enough time to read a book, or you’ve only got a few minutes, whether it’s on your commute or you’re just trying to kill time on your phone in the bathroom.

(Don’t lie. We all do it.)

Enter the short story, the perfect platform for enjoying another world when you just don’t have the time to spare. Right now, you can get two of my shorts on Amazon for only .99c!

Looking for a story you can read in about 15 minutes that will make you think?

“Flashpoint”

41-z2KyzuQL

Donovan’s earliest memory is of the soldier who saved him as a boy.

Now a soldier himself, he’s eager to get into the fight against the rebels.

But when something strange happens during what should be a routine firefight, he finds himself questioning everything he knows to be true.

Get Flashpoint here for only .99c!

Or how about a creepy ghost story to read in the dark?

“Hush”

51H7hJOD1sL

For siblings Amelia and Nick, getting sent away to live in a Victorian foster home is scary, but they hold on to the hope that it will all just be temporary. They soon learn that sharing a room with six other children and working from dawn ’til dusk are the least of their problems, however.
The matron doesn’t care about them at all, as long as they’re quiet and out of sight, but the other children warn that breaking a rule—no matter how small—will have dire consequences.
Nick might believe in their ghostly tales of Mother Maggie, but Amelia knows that it’s all just nonsense; at least that’s what she tells herself. But as the shadows in the house begin to move and grow and their situation becomes more severe, she begins to worry that maybe there’s more to the ghost stories after all. Something sinister lurking in the halls of their new home seems to watch their every step, waiting…

Get Hush here for only .99c!

If anyone else would like to link to their favorite short stories on Amazon in the comments below, please share!

Happy reading!

10 Things a Bookworm Loves

Blog Articles

Books Rock My World

Bookworms love to love. We particularly adore anything book related. Or anything which adds to the decadence of the reading experience. Here are 10 bookish things that excite and delight a bookworm:

1. Reading nooks

Reading-nook-and-window.jpg

The dream is to have our own personalized reading nook, complete with lighting, bookshelves, a comfy seating space, and various bookish memorabilia. However, for those of us who aren’t fortunate enough to have our own, we find enjoyment through Pinterest, which allows us to browse the plethora of pictures of reading nooks we hope we’ll be able to have one day.

2. Pretty covers

28685934_10213598137520164_1581464968542474391_n.jpg

I’m ashamed to say that, sometimes, we bookworms do judge a book by its cover- how can we not when some covers are just so blooming beautiful? Although it isn’t the most important aspect of a book when you’re reading something that looks so exquisite you can’t help but feel extra…

View original post 506 more words